The only thing getting me out of bed today (a day in which I’m not prepped for either class and which includes a long drive in traffic to a school-related event after school) is remembering that no one will judge me for wearing jeans and a hoodie today.

Today I received an award

It was from the university in town. My alma mater. The English department, specifically. Students who now go to that university nominated me, and then they showed up for the ceremony. It was so wonderful to see them.

Many teachers were nominated and received the awards, and it was so interesting to listen to the kids talk about why they chose that teacher. The common thread was the personal connection (“She actually cared about me as a person.”) and skilled, passionate teaching (“I actually liked English for the first time ever.”).

The whole thing was just heartwarming. A reminder of why we do it. A reminder that we’re planting seeds that grow into successful college students. A reminder that a smile and a “Is everything ok?” can go a long way. A reminder that what we do matters.

But there was a moment of frustration. A teacher ranted about Common Core instead of thanking her student. A teacher used this time as a soapbox. A time to be political. She used this as an opportunity to say, “What I do works - don’t tell me what I can and can’t teach!” And then as an afterthought, “Oh, and thank you (name). I love you.”

And then another moment of frustration. A teacher who thanked his student then turned to the audience to explain what it meant to him to get that award right now. See, he’s in his first year as an assistant principal, and he’s overwhelmed and appreciated the reminder of why we do it. And a person behind me boo’d him. BOO’d him. As a joke. Allegedly. Isn’t the fact that you hate administrators a sign that we need better administrators? When a quality teacher decides to be a leader, we should thank them - not boo them at an awards ceremony.

We do great things. And it’s events like this that prevent us from becoming jaded. Is the award prestigious? No. Does it take much to get it? Not really. But is the experience important? Absolutely. And I hope you all get a reminder that you’re amazing before you become too cynical.

I’m a straightforward person

Which means oftentimes after a conversation in which someone expresses real emotion, I look back and think about what I said and think, “I’m actually an insensitive asshole.”

My favorite TDS moment.

(Source: drunkonstephen, via livingwiththebeatles)

"

Today’s decision eviscerates an important strand of our equal protection jurisprudence. For members of historically marginalized groups, which rely on the federal courts to protect their constitutional rights, the decision can hardly bolster hope for a vision of democracy that preserves for all the right to participate meaningfully and equally in self-government.

I respectfully dissent.

"

Supreme Court Justice SONIA SOTOMAYOR, concluding her forceful, data-driven dissent in Schuette v. BAMN; her dissent begins on p. 51. (via inothernews)

She probably wrote that she respectfully dissents because that’s what Supreme Court justices have to say, but maybe she actually wanted to write, “Y’all are assholes. Except for you, Ruth. You’re a badass.”

adiemtocarpe:

vwalker:

elviajedelaesperanza:

ramblingsofkallie:

pbghgirl:

This is me. I think I even have that hair style at this point.

yup. 110% accurate

Exactly what my hair looked like today. Whoops…#sorrynotsorrry

So truthy it hurts.On point for the hair too.

The hair. Yes.

My hair looks exactly like this right now.

adiemtocarpe:

vwalker:

elviajedelaesperanza:

ramblingsofkallie:

pbghgirl:

This is me. I think I even have that hair style at this point.

yup. 110% accurate

Exactly what my hair looked like today. Whoops…#sorrynotsorrry

So truthy it hurts.
On point for the hair too.

The hair. Yes.

My hair looks exactly like this right now.

That moment the night before going back to school after a long weekend when your face feels hot but your temperature is low (is 96.5 a normal body temperature?) and you feel nauseated and you’re contemplating how much your co-teacher would hate you for taking tomorrow as a rest day even though you have rested for the majority of the long weekend.

That’s where I’m at right now.

Guess What?

markct:

I’m no professional artist, or scientist, and heck even saying I’m a professional teacher would be debatable after some of the answers my students put down on tests…. But I want students to seriously learn and be seriously scientifically literate! So I did my part and made some things to help!

Oh, Easter. Another religious holiday that I don’t understand nor observe, spent with my husband’s Catholic family that kindly ignores my religious ignorance and hugs and kisses me welcomingly (is that a word?). We eat delicious food and drink delicious wine and my faith in “love thy neighbor” is restored and the concept of family (also somewhat foreign to me) supersedes everything.

And wine.

"

I’ve never been female. But I have been black my whole life. I can perhaps offer some insight from that perspective. There are many similar social issues related to access to equal opportunity that we find in the black community, as well as the community of women in a white male dominate society…

When I look at — throughout my life — I’ve known that I wanted to do astrophysics since I was 9 years old…I got to see how the world around me reacted to my expressions of these ambitions. All I can say is, the fact that I wanted to be a scientist, an astrophysicist was hands down the path of most resistance through the forces of society.

Anytime I expressed this interest, teachers would say, ‘Oh, don’t you wanna be an athlete?’ I want to become someone that was outside of the paradigm of expectations of the people in power. Fortunately, my depth of interest of the universe was so deep and so fuel enriched that everyone of these curve balls that I was thrown, and fences built in front of me, and hills that I had to climb, I just reach for more fuel, and I just kept going.

Now, here I am, one of the most visible scientists in the land, and I wanna look behind me and say, ‘Where are the others who might have been this,’ and they’re not there! …I happened to survive and others did not simply because of forces of society that prevented it at every turn. At every turn.

…My life experience tells me that when you don’t find blacks, when you don’t find women in the sciences, I know that these forces are real, and I had to survive them in order to get where I am today.

So before we start talking about genetic differences, you gotta come up with a system where there’s equal opportunity, then we can have that conversation.

"

Neil DeGrasse Tyson in response to a question posed by Lawrence Summers, former Treasury Security and Harvard University President

"What’s up with chicks and science?"

Are there genetic differences between men and women, explain why more men are in science.

(via magnius159)

(via compositional)