"

I’ve never been female. But I have been black my whole life. I can perhaps offer some insight from that perspective. There are many similar social issues related to access to equal opportunity that we find in the black community, as well as the community of women in a white male dominate society…

When I look at — throughout my life — I’ve known that I wanted to do astrophysics since I was 9 years old…I got to see how the world around me reacted to my expressions of these ambitions. All I can say is, the fact that I wanted to be a scientist, an astrophysicist was hands down the path of most resistance through the forces of society.

Anytime I expressed this interest, teachers would say, ‘Oh, don’t you wanna be an athlete?’ I want to become someone that was outside of the paradigm of expectations of the people in power. Fortunately, my depth of interest of the universe was so deep and so fuel enriched that everyone of these curve balls that I was thrown, and fences built in front of me, and hills that I had to climb, I just reach for more fuel, and I just kept going.

Now, here I am, one of the most visible scientists in the land, and I wanna look behind me and say, ‘Where are the others who might have been this,’ and they’re not there! …I happened to survive and others did not simply because of forces of society that prevented it at every turn. At every turn.

…My life experience tells me that when you don’t find blacks, when you don’t find women in the sciences, I know that these forces are real, and I had to survive them in order to get where I am today.

So before we start talking about genetic differences, you gotta come up with a system where there’s equal opportunity, then we can have that conversation.

"

Neil DeGrasse Tyson in response to a question posed by Lawrence Summers, former Treasury Security and Harvard University President

"What’s up with chicks and science?"

Are there genetic differences between men and women, explain why more men are in science.

(via magnius159)

(via compositional)

jamvega:

Junot Díaz & Peter Sagal: Immigrants, Masculinity, Nerds, & Art [x]

We also have a popular culture which acts as a megaphone for the larger American tendencies towards anti-intellectualism.

(via potentialtomorrows)

Gabriel García Márquez Dead: Nobel Prize-Winning Author Dies At 87

grayer:

His style was so deep and unique. Reading his novels is a life-shaping experience.

I didn’t really like literature when I was young. I was a journalist, and I just wanted everyone to get to the point. Say what you mean and mean what you say. Cut the flowery language and symbols.

And then after college I picked up Love in the Time of Cholera. It required patience. It was full of flowery language. It was all the things I hated, but I couldn’t put it down. My love affair with that book mirrored the love affair between the main characters. One resisting the whole way while unable to let go, and the other just waiting for her to come around and realize they were in love.

It sparked my love affair with literature, and Gabriel Garcia Marquez will always have a place in my heart.

(Source: dietcokeporfavor, via teachingtoday)

The Overprotected Kid - The Atlantic

jibteaches:

A long read but an absolutely fascinating article. I find that a vast majority of my students don’t know how to struggle or problem solve without wanting to give up quickly. My guess is that many of their parents swoop in and “fix” challenges before a child is allowed or encouraged to try. This creates a difficult dynamic in the classroom and beyond.

As a new parent (one-month old baby girl) my hope is that she tries new things, big and small. I hope she develops skills and awareness through experience. She cannot do that in over-structured sterile environments. So kid, get messy, make mistakes, and learn!

It also has to do with mindset. If they’ve grown up being told they’re smart and they’ve received praise at every turn, they falter when they might make a mistake. Instead of being ok with mistakes and accepting that as part if the process, they fear judgment and ridicule. They worry that they’re not living up to the smart title. They value talent over effort. They have a fixed mindset.

I highly recommend everyone read Mindset by Carol Dweck. It explains so much about our students’ behavior, and it’s an insight into our own behavior as well.

(via adventuresofastudentteacher)

It’s the kind of day when tired doesn’t cover it. When things were unexpectedly frustrating in class. When I wasn’t prepared and had to change gears completely to accommodate someone else. When I had meeting 1 and then drove to the district office for meeting 2, and both meetings were not what I expected and we didn’t get enough done. When I still have to work after dinner because I have too much responsibility and am leading a meeting in the morning. I just realized that will be the third meeting in 24 hours.

And after all this I start reading Tumblr to relax, and even that is too much work.

image

girlcanteach:

I have one answer to this question and it is always yes. 
Like, do you have to go to the bathroom?  Then go.  Do you need to get up and walk around for two minutes and get a drink of water because it’s fourth period and you’ve been sitting for four hours?  Then go.  Do you need to get out of the room for a minute because you’re feeling anxious/stir crazy/hot/cold/claustrophobic/sick of my voice?  Then go.
Go quietly. Come back quietly.  Don’t interrupt me.  Just have a seat and I’ll catch you up when I have a second if you missed anything major.
There’s SOOOOO much to deal with in a day. I just can’t tell kids they can’t go to the bathroom.  I won’t. 

girlcanteach - Yuuuuuup. I thought the same thing when I saw this earlier.

To others thinking, “But some kids will abuse it!” Probably. And that’s when you pull that kid aside and ask them about it. And you deal with it one-on-one.

Everyone needs a break now and then.

girlcanteach:

I have one answer to this question and it is always yes. 

Like, do you have to go to the bathroom?  Then go.  Do you need to get up and walk around for two minutes and get a drink of water because it’s fourth period and you’ve been sitting for four hours?  Then go.  Do you need to get out of the room for a minute because you’re feeling anxious/stir crazy/hot/cold/claustrophobic/sick of my voice?  Then go.

Go quietly. Come back quietly.  Don’t interrupt me.  Just have a seat and I’ll catch you up when I have a second if you missed anything major.

There’s SOOOOO much to deal with in a day. I just can’t tell kids they can’t go to the bathroom.  I won’t. 

girlcanteach - Yuuuuuup. I thought the same thing when I saw this earlier. To others thinking, “But some kids will abuse it!” Probably. And that’s when you pull that kid aside and ask them about it. And you deal with it one-on-one. Everyone needs a break now and then.

(Source: elementarymydearauburn)

thorneytowers:

this is a text post about frankenstein. in the book there’s none of this “it’s alive” bullshit frankenstein takes one look at that thing & is like “whoa, that’s kind of nasty, i’m going to bed”

And then he goes all Urkel with a “Did I do thaaaat?”

(Source: crimester, via englishmajorinrepair)

Sometimes I sit on the couch in such a way that my lap isn’t readily available to the dog. And when she decides she wants to sit there she mountain goats her way over my knees and turns in circles and sits right on top of whatever is in her way. And even if she’s falling over or sliding down my leg, she sits.

Because that is her place whether I like it or not.

Sometimes I sit on the couch in such a way that my lap isn’t readily available to the dog. And when she decides she wants to sit there she mountain goats her way over my knees and turns in circles and sits right on top of whatever is in her way. And even if she’s falling over or sliding down my leg, she sits.

Because that is her place whether I like it or not.

Note to a Junior High Student

This is everything I want my students to know.

This is why I leave comments and not a grade.

And when I grade the final draft, I don’t leave comments (the rubric is all we need at that point).

(Source: englishmajorinrepair)

A disjointed thought.

hithertokt:

"I learned how to not procrastinate from my teachers marking my papers down a grade," she does not say, sitting on her couch at nearly 11pm on a Sunday night with ideas decided upon in her head, but zero pl*ns written down.

This is my truth; I speak for no one else: I also…